Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix, Poetry by Sarah

Clotted

We find ourselves in a spot
Whether we admit it or not

This pandemic has exposed the rot
Of our capitalist melting pot

Trying to gallop before we trot
Our economies a twisted knot

Hoping upon a vaccine’s our lot
Until then…stuck like a clot

By Sara©2020

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie, Saturday Mix – Rhyme Time, 22 August 2020

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 18 April 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip,18 April 2020!

For this week’s Lucky Dip, I have reached into my mystery bag and pulled out a Roundabout.The topic is up to you!

You may be thinking to yourself, What on earth is a Roundabout?

Luckily, Writer’s Digest has an explanation…

Roundabout Poems

Invented by Sara Diane Doyle and David Edwards, who incoporated every poetic element that they really liked.David came up with the meter and feet and Sara added in the repeating line. The rhyme scheme and length was decided on together.The result is a form called the Roundabout. In this form, the rhyme scheme comes full circle while offering repetition of one line in each rhyme set.

The Roundabout is a four stanza poem, with each stanza consisting of 5 lines.The poem is written in iambic and the lines have 4 feet, 3 feet, 2 feet, 2 feet…

View original post 164 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Opposing Forces, 11 April 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix, 11 April 2020!

This week we are dipping our toes into the pool of OPPOSITES. Our challenge is all about “opposing forces” and the use of antithesis in our writing. You will need to use the two opposing words in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our words this week are:

– rough and gentle

– same and different

You may be asking yourself, How can I use antithetical statements in my writing?

Luckily, Kat from Literary Devices has some examples for you.

Common Antithesis Examples
Some famous antithetical statements have become part of our everyday speech and are frequently used in arguments and discussions. Below is the list of some antithetical statements:

You are easy on the eyes, but hard on the heart.
Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice.
Love is an ideal thing, marriage a real thing.

View original post 235 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Rhyme Time, 4 April 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix, 4 April 2020!

This week we are “writing away, and having a play, with rhyming words for you today” with Rhyme Time.

‘Rhyme Time’ focuses on the use of rhyme to build your writing piece. You will be given six rhyming words* and need to use all of them (but not limited to these) in your response, which should be a poetry form of your choice.

*Homophones can be used as alternatives to the challenge words.

Our rhyming words this week are:

  1. wire
  2. dire
  3. fire
  4. mire
  5. tyre (or tire)
  6. quire (or choir)

You may be thinking to yourself, How can I use rhyme in my writing?
Luckily, Kat at Literary Devices, has some examples for you.

Examples of Rhyme in Poetry
A rhyme is a repetition of similar sounding words, occurring at the end of lines in poems or songs. A rhyme is…

View original post 341 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Double Take, 28 March 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix, 28 March 2020!

This week we are seeing double with ‘Double Take’.

The ‘Double Take’ challenge focuses on the use of homophones* to build your writing piece. You have two sets of homophones and you are challenged to use all of them in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our homophone sets this week are:

meat – animal flesh
meet – to connect
mete – a boundary

and

pride – ego
pryed – opened

You may be thinking to yourself, How can I use homophones in my writing?
Luckily, Kat at Literary Devices, has some examples for you.

Example of Homophones in Literature
This poem is filled homophones (marked in bold). They create a humorous effect in the poem through having the same pronunciation but altogether different meanings.

Sole owner am I of this sorry soul
pour

View original post 157 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 21 March 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip,21 March 2020!

For this week’s Lucky Dip, I have reached into my mystery bag and pulled out a Somonka.The topic is up to you!

You may be thinking to yourself, What on earth is a Somonka?

Luckily, Writer’s Digest has an explanation…

Somonka Poems

The somonka is a Japanese form. In fact, it’s basically two tankas written as two love letters to each other (one tanka per love letter). This form usually demands two authors, but it is possible to have a poet take on two personas. Click here for a refresher on the tanka.

Example of a Somonka

Sugar

I’m waiting to die;
I think it will happen soon–
this morning, I saw
two bright hummingbirds battling
over some sugar water.

I know; I was there.
I chased after them for you
until thirst stopped me.
Fetch me…

View original post 56 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Mad About Metaphor, 14 March 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Mad About Metaphor, 14 March 2020!

This week we are dipping our toes into the pool of METAPHOR. Our challenge is all about the use of metaphor in our writing. You will need to use the metaphor provided in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our metaphor this week is:

– The classroom was a zoo.

You may be asking yourself, How can I use metaphor in my writing?

Luckily, yourdictionary.com has some examples for you.

Simply put, a metaphor is a figure of speech containing an implied comparison. With metaphors, words or phrases that are ordinarily applied to one thing are applied to something you wouldn’t necessarily pair it with. Metaphors are members of the figurative language family, which also include elements like similes, onomatopoeia, and personification.

Common Metaphor Examples

Some famous metaphors have become part of our everyday speech and are frequently used in…

View original post 362 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Rhyme Time, 7 March 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix, 7 March 2020!

This week we are “writing away, and having a play, with rhyming words for you today” with Rhyme Time.

‘Rhyme Time’ focuses on the use of rhyme to build your writing piece. You will be given six rhyming words* and need to use all of them (but not limited to these) in your response, which should be a poetry form of your choice.

*Homophones can be used as alternatives to the challenge words.

Our rhyming words this week are:

  1. mock
  2. shock
  3. stock
  4. lock
  5. hock
  6. block

You may be thinking to yourself, How can I use rhyme in my writing?
Luckily, Kat at Literary Devices, has some examples for you.

Examples of Rhyme in Poetry
A rhyme is a repetition of similar sounding words, occurring at the end of lines in poems or songs. A rhyme is a tool utilizing repeating…

View original post 337 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Double Take, 29 February 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix, 29 February 2020!

This week we are seeing double with ‘Double Take’.

The ‘Double Take’ challenge focuses on the use of homophones* to build your writing piece. You have two sets of homophones and you are challenged to use all of them in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our homophone sets this week are:

gait – manner of walking or running
gate – fence door

and

leased – rented
least – the minimum

You may be thinking to yourself, How can I use homophones in my writing?
Luckily, Kat at Literary Devices, has some examples for you.

Example of Homophones in Literature
This poem is filled homophones (marked in bold). They create a humorous effect in the poem through having the same pronunciation but altogether different meanings.

Sole owner am I of this sorry soul
pour

View original post 157 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 22 February 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip,22 February2020!

For this week’s Lucky Dip, I have reached into my mystery bag and pulled out a Tautogram.The topic is up to you!

You may be thinking to yourself, What on earth is a Tautogram?

Luckily, Writer’s Digest has an explanation…

Tautogram Poems

The tautogram is best explained by its Greek root words of “tauto” meaning “the same” and “gramma” meaning “letter.” Basically, all words in the poem begin with the same letter.

So pick a letter–any letter–and get poeming!

Note: A variant form of this poem could employ a unique starting letter for each stanza.

Example of a Tautogram

Thoroughly Terse Tautogram

Twelve turkeys trekked through Turkey
to tell tales that tackled topsy-
turvy televangelists traipsing through
turnkey topics turned to tropics,
though ten teased topical tenets.

Copyright ©Robert Lee Brewer

Good luck with your ‘Lucky Dip Tautogram’ – I…

View original post 34 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Opposing Forces, 15 February 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix, 15 February 2020!

This week we are dipping our toes into the pool of OPPOSITES. Our challenge is all about “opposing forces” and the use of antithesis in our writing. You will need to use the two opposing words in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our words this week are:

– mend and break

– noon and midnight

You may be asking yourself, How can I use antithetical statements in my writing?

Luckily, Kat from Literary Devices has some examples for you.

Common Antithesis Examples
Some famous antithetical statements have become part of our everyday speech and are frequently used in arguments and discussions. Below is the list of some antithetical statements:

You are easy on the eyes, but hard on the heart.
Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice.
Love is an ideal thing, marriage a real thing.

View original post 235 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Rhyme Time, 8 February 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix, 8 February 2020!

This week we are “writing away, and having a play, with rhyming words for you today” with Rhyme Time.

‘Rhyme Time’ focuses on the use of rhyme to build your writing piece. You will be given six rhyming words* and need to use all of them (but not limited to these) in your response, which should be a poetry form of your choice.

*Homophones can be used as alternatives to the challenge words.

Our rhyming words this week are:

  1. bell (or belle)
  2. quell
  3. dwell
  4. smell
  5. yell
  6. tell

You may be thinking to yourself, How can I use rhyme in my writing?
Luckily, Kat at Literary Devices, has some examples for you.

Examples of Rhyme in Poetry
A rhyme is a repetition of similar sounding words, occurring at the end of lines in poems or songs. A rhyme is a tool…

View original post 339 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Double Take, 1 February 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix, 1 February 2020!

This week we are seeing double with ‘Double Take’.

The ‘Double Take’ challenge focuses on the use of homophones* to build your writing piece. You have two sets of homophones and you are challenged to use all of them in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our homophone sets this week are:

fair – even-handed

fare – payment

and

foul – grossly offensive to the senses

fowl – domestic hen or rooster

You may be thinking to yourself, How can I use homophones in my writing?
Luckily, Kat at Literary Devices, has some examples for you.

Example of Homophones in Literature
This poem is filled homophones (marked in bold). They create a humorous effect in the poem through having the same pronunciation but altogether different meanings.

Sole owner am I of this sorry soul

View original post 158 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 25 January 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip,25 January 2020!

For this week’s Lucky Dip, I have reached into my mystery bag and pulled out a Clogyrnach (pronounced: clog-IR-nach). The topic is up to you!

You may be thinking to yourself, What on earth is a Clogyrnach?

Luckily, Writer’s Digest has an explanation…

Clogyrnach

Besides being another fun form to say, clogyrnach is also a fun poem to write. This Welsh poetic form is typically a six-line syllabic stanza with an ab rhyme scheme:

Line 1: 8 syllables with an a rhyme
Line 2: 8 syllables with an a rhyme
Line 3: 5 syllables with a b rhyme
Line 4: 5 syllables with a b rhyme
Line 5: 3 syllables with a b rhyme
Line 6: 3 syllables with an a rhyme

Note: There’s also a variant that combines lines 5 and 6 into one line–making a 5-line stanza…

View original post 130 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Rhyme Time, 11 January 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix, 11 January 2020!

“Write away, and have a play, with rhyming words for you today!”

This week I am introducing a new challenge to the Saturday Mix – ‘Rhyme Time.

‘Rhyme Time’ focuses on the use of rhyme to build your writing piece. You will be given six rhyming words* and need to use all of them (but not limited to these) in your response, which should be a poetry form of your choice.

*Homophones can be used as alternatives to the challenge words.

Our rhyming words this week are:

  1. square
  2. air
  3. bare (or bear)
  4. flare (or flair)
  5. pair (or pear)
  6. fair (or fare)

You may be thinking to yourself, How can I use rhyme in my writing?
Luckily, Kat at Literary Devices, has some examples for you.

Examples of Rhyme in Poetry
A rhyme is a repetition of similar…

View original post 356 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 28 December 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip Fan Favourites, 28 December 2019!

For this week’s Lucky Dip, I have reached into my mystery bag and pulled out some Saturday Mix history! I have been running the Saturday Mix Challenge now for a little over two years. I thought, seeing as it is the end of 2019, it would be a great opportunity to find out from YOU what your favourite Saturday Mix Challenge is!

So…this week, I want you to write on a topic of your choice, using the challenge format of your preference. Choose one, or two, or all! It’s up to you. If you are a little too busy during this silly season to participate, there is also the option of a poll (see below) so you can let me know which Saturday Mix Challenges you love best and what you would like to see in 2020.

View original post 394 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Sound Bite, 21 December 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Sound Bite, 21 December 2019!

This week we are hearing things, as we explore the use of ONOMATOPOEIA. You will need to use the THREE onomatopoeic words in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our three words, using onomatopoeia are:

  • chortle
  • flop
  • murmur

You may be asking yourself, How can I use onomatopoeia in my writing?

Luckily, Your Dictionaryhas some examples for you.

The word onomatopoeia comes from the combination of two Greek words,onomameaning “name” andpoieinmeaning “to make,” so onomatopoeia literally means “to make a name (or sound).” That is to say that the word means nothing more than the sound it makes. The word “boing,” for example, is simply a sound effect, but one that is very useful in making writing or storytelling more expressive and vivid.

Many onomatopoeic words can be verbs as well…

View original post 256 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Unique Personality, 14 December 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Unique Personality, 14 December 2019!

This week we are diving into the depths of PERSONIFICATION. Our challenge is all about the use of personification in our writing. You will need to use the statement provided in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our statement using, personification is:

The ship danced over the undulating waves of the ocean.

You may be asking yourself, How can I use personification in my writing?

Luckily, Literary Deviceshas some examples for you.

Personification is one of the most commonly used and recognized literary devices. It refers to the practice of attaching human traits and characteristics with inanimate objects, phenomena and animals.

Common Personification Examples

Personification is part of our everyday speech and is frequently used in writing and oral language.

  • “The raging winds”
  • “The wise owl”
  • “The warm and comforting fire”

Example of Personification…

View original post 131 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Mad About Metaphor, 7 December 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Mad About Metaphor, 7 December 2019!

This week we are dipping our toes into the pool of METAPHOR. Our challenge is all about the use of metaphor in our writing. You will need to use the metaphor provided in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our metaphor this week is:

The cut of your jib.

You may be asking yourself, How can I use metaphor in my writing?

Luckily, yourdictionary.comhas some examples for you.

Simply put,a metaphoris a figure of speech containing an implied comparison. With metaphors, words or phrases that are ordinarily applied to one thing are applied to something you wouldn’t necessarily pair it with. Metaphors are members of thefigurative languagefamily, which also include elements likesimiles,onomatopoeia, andpersonification.

Common Metaphor Examples

Some famous metaphors have become part of our everyday speech and are frequently used in…

View original post 361 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 30 November 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 30 November 2019!

For this week’s Lucky Dip, I have reached into my mystery bag and pulled out a Alliterisen. The topic is up to you!

You may be thinking to yourself, What on earth is a Alliterisen?

Luckily, Shadow Poetry has an explanation…

Alliterisen
The Alliterisen (Complex and Rhyming), a form created by Udit Bhatia, is a simple seven-lined poem with a specific syllable pattern and two alliterations per line. For example: Glorious Graves, and wonderful waves. Alliteration is the succession of similar consonant sounds. They are not recognized by spelling, but rather by sounds. The syllable structure for the Complex Alliterisen is as follows:

1st line- x syllables
2nd line- x+2 syllables
3rd line- x-1 syllables
4th line- (x+2)-1 syllables
5th line- x-2 syllables
6th line- (x+2)-2 syllables
7th line- x syllables

which allows for infinite syllable sequences. Listed…

View original post 163 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Sound Bite, 23 November 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Sound Bite, 23 November 2019!

This week we are hearing things, as we explore the use of ONOMATOPOEIA. You will need to use the THREE onomatopoeic words in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our three words, using onomatopoeia are:

  • ring
  • clip-clop
  • hiccup

You may be asking yourself, How can I use onomatopoeia in my writing?

Luckily, Your Dictionaryhas some examples for you.

The word onomatopoeia comes from the combination of two Greek words,onomameaning “name” andpoieinmeaning “to make,” so onomatopoeia literally means “to make a name (or sound).” That is to say that the word means nothing more than the sound it makes. The word “boing,” for example, is simply a sound effect, but one that is very useful in making writing or storytelling more expressive and vivid.

Many onomatopoeic words can be verbs as well…

View original post 256 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Unique Personality, 16 November 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Unique Personality, 16 November 2019!

This week we are diving into the depths of PERSONIFICATION. Our challenge is all about the use of personification in our writing. You will need to use the statement provided in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our statement using, personification is:

As he began the test, all words and ideas fled from his mind.

You may be asking yourself, How can I use personification in my writing?

Luckily, Literary Devices has some examples for you.

Personification is one of the most commonly used and recognized literary devices. It refers to the practice of attaching human traits and characteristics with inanimate objects, phenomena and animals.

Common Personification Examples

Personification is part of our everyday speech and is frequently used in writing and oral language.

  • “The raging winds”
  • “The wise owl”
  • “The warm and comforting fire”

View original post 135 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Mad About Metaphor, 9 November 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Mad About Metaphor, 9 November 2019!

This week we are dipping our toes into the pool of METAPHOR. Our challenge is all about the use of metaphor in our writing. You will need to use the metaphor provided in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our metaphor this week is:

The idea was difficult to swallow.

You may be asking yourself, How can I use metaphor in my writing?

Luckily, yourdictionary.comhas some examples for you.

Simply put,a metaphoris a figure of speech containing an implied comparison. With metaphors, words or phrases that are ordinarily applied to one thing are applied to something you wouldn’t necessarily pair it with. Metaphors are members of thefigurative languagefamily, which also include elements likesimiles,onomatopoeia, andpersonification.

Common Metaphor Examples

Some famous metaphors have become part of our everyday speech and are frequently used…

View original post 362 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 2 November 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 2 November 2019!

For this week’s Lucky Dip, I have reached into my mystery bag and pulled out a Diatelle. The topic is up to you!

You may be thinking to yourself, What on earth is a Diatelle?

Luckily, Shadow Poetry has an explanation…

Diatelle
The Diatelle is a fun, syllable counting form like the etheree with a twist. The syllable structure of the diatelle is as follows: 1/2/3/4/6/8/10/12/10/8/6/4/3/2/1, but unlike an ethere, has a set rhyme pattern of abbcbccaccbcbba. This poetry form may be written on any subject matter and looks best center aligned in a diamond shape.

The Diatelle form was created by Bradley Vrooman.

Example of a Diatelle

Example:

Good luck with your ‘Lucky Dip Diatelle’ – I can’t wait to see what you come up with! Don’t forget to tag ‘Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie’, ‘Saturday Mix’, and hashtag #LuckyDip.

View original post 14 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Sound Bite, 26 October 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Sound Bite, 26 October 2019!

This week we are hearing things, as we explore the use of ONOMATOPOEIA. You will need to use the THREE onomatopoeic words in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our three words, using onomatopoeia are:

  • ouch
  • pong
  • rattle

You may be asking yourself, How can I use onomatopoeia in my writing?

Luckily, Your Dictionaryhas some examples for you.

The word onomatopoeia comes from the combination of two Greek words,onomameaning “name” andpoieinmeaning “to make,” so onomatopoeia literally means “to make a name (or sound).” That is to say that the word means nothing more than the sound it makes. The word “boing,” for example, is simply a sound effect, but one that is very useful in making writing or storytelling more expressive and vivid.

Many onomatopoeic words can be verbs as well…

View original post 256 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Unique Personality, 19 October 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Unique Personality, 19 October 2019!

This week we are diving into the depths of PERSONIFICATION. Our challenge is all about the use of personification in our writing. You will need to use the statement provided in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our statement using, personification is:

There was a heavy thunderstorm, the wind snorted outside, rattling my windowpanes.

You may be asking yourself, How can I use personification in my writing?

Luckily, Literary Deviceshas some examples for you.

Personification is one of the most commonly used and recognized literary devices. It refers to the practice of attaching human traits and characteristics with inanimate objects, phenomena and animals.

Common Personification Examples

Personification is part of our everyday speech and is frequently used in writing and oral language.

  • “The raging winds”
  • “The wise owl”
  • “The warm and comforting fire”

Example…

View original post 133 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Mad About Metaphor, 12 October 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Mad About Metaphor, 12 October 2019!

This week we are dipping our toes into the pool of METAPHOR. Our challenge is all about the use of metaphor in our writing. You will need to use the metaphor provided in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our metaphor this week is:

Love is a battlefield.

You may be asking yourself, How can I use metaphor in my writing?

Luckily, yourdictionary.comhas some examples for you.

Simply put,a metaphoris a figure of speech containing an implied comparison. With metaphors, words or phrases that are ordinarily applied to one thing are applied to something you wouldn’t necessarily pair it with. Metaphors are members of thefigurative languagefamily, which also include elements likesimiles,onomatopoeia, andpersonification.

Common Metaphor Examples

Some famous metaphors have become part of our everyday speech and are frequently used in writing…

View original post 360 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 5 October 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 5 October 2019!

For this week’s Lucky Dip, I have reached into my mystery bag and pulled out a Monotetra. The topic is up to you!

You may be thinking to yourself, What on earth is a Monotetra?

Luckily, Shadow Poetry has an explanation…

Monotetra
The monotetra is a new poetic form developed by Michael Walker. Each stanza contains four lines in monorhyme. Each line is in tetrameter (four metrical feet) for a total of eight syllables. What makes the monotetra so powerful as a poetic form, is that the last line contains two metrical feet, repeated. It can have as few as one or two stanzas, or as many as desired.

Stanza Structure:

Line 1: 8 syllables; A1
Line 2: 8 syllables; A2
Line 3: 8 syllables; A3
Line 4: 4 syllables, repeated; A4, A4

Example of Monotetra

Example #1:

View original post 166 more words