Photos by Sarah, Tuesday Photo Challenge

Pink Heath

Epacris impressa (Common Heath) – Victoria’s floral emblem. Shrub grows to 2m, flowers 1 to 2cm, colour ranging from white, pink, red, magenta, but very variable. 


Image credit By Sarah ©2017;   Bullace Glen, Grampians National Park, Victoria


Prompt: Dutch Goes The Photo, Tuesday Photo Challenge, Week 71 – pink


Photos by Sarah, Tuesday Photo Challenge

Pink Lake

About 10kms west of Dimboola, VIC, next to the Western Highway, you can find Pink Lake. This lake is easily viewed from the rest-stop beside the highway and you can walk down the path to the edge of the lake. The pink colour comes from a pigment secreted by algae which is more intense when there is water in the lake. During dry periods the salt lake appears more white due to the light reflected by salt crystals.

As you walk along the path to the lake, you will see yellow gums, buloke trees and paperbarks, giving way to the smaller and very distinctive salt tolerant plants that grow in this unique environment. 

Information source: http://www.dimboola.com.au and 360 cities (click this for a 360o panorama!)


Image credit By Sarah ©2017

Prompt: Dutch Goes The Photo, Tuesday Photo Challenge, Week 71 – pink

Photos by Sarah, Thursday Doors

Versailles

Technically, not a door, but thought this was too spectacular not to share. This is one of the gates from the Palace of Versailles at the ‘Versailles: Treasures from the Palace’ exhibition.


Image credit By Sarah ©2017;        Versailles Exhibition, National Gallery of Australia, ACT

Prompt: Norm 2.0, Thursday Doors – August 17, 2017 

Daily Post Weekly Challenge, Photos by Sarah

La Cantina

Distracted by wine (…especially red wine), I will always pause when passing a winery, to sample their wares if appropriate! Also, these bottles look super shiny and pretty all stacked up and ready to buy!


Image credit By Sarah ©2017;   La Cantina Winery, King Valley VIC

Prompt: Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge, Distractions “Oooh, shiny!”

Photos by Sarah, Tuesday Photo Challenge

Silent Street

“Silent Street” – This stone alleyway forms one of the last parts of the Pinnacle Walk in the Grampians National Park, Victoria. Due to the high rock walls and almost fully enclosed nature of the gully, there is an eerie silence as you walk through.

Prompt: Dutch Goes The Photo, Week 70 – alley

Photos by Sarah, Thursday Doors

Whakarewarewa Village

Good luck getting in this front door! A newly formed sinkhole has made things a little perilous at this home in Whakarewarewa Maori Village, Rotorua, NZ.


Image credit By Sarah

Author’s Note: Whakarewarewa village is situated in the unique geothermal landscape of Te Whakarewarewa Valley. The only living geothermal Māori village, geothermal vents provide a life-giving energy resource along with boiling hot pools and bubbling mud. Residents have been forced to utilise, respect and adapt to the ever-changing forces beneath the land.

Prompt: Norm 2.0, Thursday Doors – August 3, 2017

Daily Post Weekly Challenge, Photos by Sarah

Satisfaction is…Bushwalking

There is nothing I find more satisfying that communing with nature and grounding myself with a bushwalk. Even better if that bushwalk has a spectacular peak and/or view at the end. Here are just a few photos of my favourites!

The Pinnacle, Grampians National Park

Mt Glenrowan, Warby National Park

Gorge Walk, Mt Buffalo National Park

The Balconies, Grampians National Park

Mt Pilot, Mt Pilot National Park

Bullawah Cultural Trail, Wangaratta

Mt Taylor, Canberra 

Roper Lookout, Falls Creek

Paradise Falls, King Valley

Prompt: Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge, satisfaction

Photos by Sarah, Tuesday Photo Challenge

Wallace Hut


Wallace Hut is one of 106 huts scattered across the Alpine National Park. Many of these huts were burnt in the 2003 Alpine fires but fortunately Wallace Hut survived. Wallace Hut, near Falls Creek, is the oldest hut in the park. It was built by the three Wallace brothers – Arthur, William and Stewart – who arrived as small boys in Melbourne from Ireland in 1869 with their parents.

The hut is never locked. You enter by pulling the string hanging through a hole at the lower right of the tiny window in the split- paling door. This releases the latch and the sunlight, revealing an unusual split-slab and rammed-earth floor, a rough table of mountain ash on snow-gum legs and the fireplace at the far end. The names of cattlemen who first used the hut are burnt into the tie-beams of the roof and at the back of the mantelpiece. One small window looks towards the distant Mount Kosciusko. 

Prompt: Dutch Goes The Photo, Tuesday Photo Challenge, woods

Daily Post Weekly Challenge, Photos by Sarah

Unusual

A collection of ‘big’ things…


The Big Merino, Goulburn NSW


The Big Gumboot,  Taihape, Manawatu-Whanganui, North Island, NZ


The Big Lobster, Kingston South East, South Australia


The Big Murray Cod, Swan Hill, Victoria


The Big Cherry, Wyuna, Victoria


The Big Olive, Tailem Bend, South Australia


The Big Banana, Coffs Harbor, New South Wales


The Big Pineapple, Woombye, Queensland


The Big Koala, Dadwells Bridge, Victoria


The Big Fruit, Cromwell, Central Otago, South Island, NZ

Not sure what the fascination is that Australia and New Zealand have with ‘big things’ but it makes for interesting road trips! My bucket list consists of taking this trip one day and seeing all 150 big things…

https://www.travelwheels.com.au/site/big-things-of-australia/

Prompt: Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge, unusual