Stories by Sarah

Spin

The sky looked like ink, no stars, just black; that’s how it began. 

Shelley took a deep breath as she waited for the curtains to open. Braced for the notes that would signal her cue, a hush fell over the audience as the first tentative strains of music swirled through the theatre.

She stretched and eased herself into the well-rehearsed moves. Her form gliding effortlessly across the stage. As the crescendo approached, she began to spin.

This was why she’d become a dancer. With each turn, she felt she could truly fly.

By Sarah ©2019

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie, First Line Friday: May 24, 2019; and also, Sammi Scribbles, Weekend Writing Prompt, #107 – Spin

Other, Poetry by Sarah

Rosie

Image credit Pixabay

Last week a beautiful juvenile Rosella flew into the glass window of our classroom. After some TLC from us and ACT Wildlife and Conservation, Rosie now flies free again…

You crashed
Into the glass
Head smashed

Hurt. Stunned.
We nurtured you.
Wings sunned.

Released.
Strong again you
Fly east.

By Sarah ©2019

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie, Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 18 May 2019

Author’s note: The Musette was created by Emily Romano and is a poem that consists of three verses of three lines each. The first lines have two syllables; the second lines have four syllables, and the third lines have two syllables. The rhyme scheme is a/b/a for the first verse; c/d/c for the second verse, and e/f/e for the third verse. The title should reflect the poem’s content.

Scribblings by Sarah

Zodiac

Have mercy, dear Zodiac.
Read my stars. It’s no surprise.

Your forecast has me walking in cement.
What trials are in my booth?

I’ve heard this song before.
It’s time to shut the gate.

My heart soft with hope.
I don’t look back.

By Sarah ©2019

The Sunday Whirl, Wordle 404, and also, Sammi Scribbles, Weekend Writing Prompt, #106 – Zodiac

Stories by Sarah

Aftermath

My feet crunched on the blackened ground. Even the rocks had not been spared. So intense was the heat from the bushfire, they too had been singed.

All around me was devastation.

Twisted sheets of metal were all that was left of the house. I bent down and touched the ground where our mailbox once stood, my fingers trailing through the ash.

I trudged the perimeter fence and noted with irony, the eucalypts still standing.

Charred.
Naked.
But still standing.

Then, I saw a tiny patch of green – the tree already beginning to regenerate itself!

We too would rebuild.

By Sarah ©2019

Carrot Ranch, May 16: Flash Fiction Challenge, Prompt – In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story that goes in search of trees. It can be one particular tree, a grove, woods, or forest. What makes the tree worth seeking? Go where the prompt leads!

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 18 May 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 18 May 2019!

For this week’s Lucky Dip, I have reached into my mystery bag and pulled out a Musette. The topic is up to you!

You may be thinking to yourself, What on earth is a Musette?

Luckily, Shadow Poetry has an explanation…

Musette

The Musette, created by Emily Romano is a poem that consists of three verses of three lines each. The first lines have two syllables; the second lines have four syllables, and the third lines have two syllables. The rhyme scheme is a/b/a for the first verse; c/d/c for the second verse, and e/f/e for the third verse. The title should reflect the poem’s content.

Example of a Musette

Birds of Happiness

Rare sight—
Eastern bluebirds
Delight!

Blue wings
Flutter, tugging
Heart strings . . .

Bring luck,
Great happiness
To pluck.

Copyright © 2007 Margaret R…

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Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Sound Bite, 11 May 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Sound Bite, 11 May 2019!

This week we are hearing things, as we explore the use of ONOMATOPOEIA. You will need to use the THREE onomatopoeic words in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our three words, using onomatopoeia are:

  • bam
  • crack
  • hiss 

You may be asking yourself, How can I use onomatopoeia in my writing?

Luckily, Your Dictionary has some examples for you.

The word onomatopoeia comes from the combination of two Greek words, onoma meaning “name” and poiein meaning “to make,” so onomatopoeia literally means “to make a name (or sound).” That is to say that the word means nothing more than the sound it makes. The word “boing,” for example, is simply a sound effect, but one that is very useful in making writing or storytelling more expressive and vivid.

Many onomatopoeic words can be verbs as well…

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Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Unique Personality, 4 May 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Unique Personality, 4 May 2019!

This week we are diving into the depths of PERSONIFICATION. Our challenge is all about the use of personification in our writing. You will need to use the statement provided in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our statement using, personification is:

The tall pines on the hill poked at the clouds.

You may be asking yourself, How can I use personification in my writing?

Luckily, Literary Devices has some examples for you.

Personification is one of the most commonly used and recognized literary devices. It refers to the practice of attaching human traits and characteristics with inanimate objects, phenomena and animals.

Common Personification Examples

Personification is part of our everyday speech and is frequently used in writing and oral language.

  • “The raging winds”
  • “The wise owl”
  • “The warm and comforting fire”

Example of Personification…

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