Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Mad About Metaphor, 22 June 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Mad About Metaphor, 22 June 2019!

This week we are dipping our toes into the pool of METAPHOR. Our challenge is all about the use of metaphor in our writing. You will need to use the metaphor provided in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our metaphor this week is:

Blow one’s own trumpet.

You may be asking yourself, How can I use metaphor in my writing?

Luckily, yourdictionary.comhas some examples for you.

Simply put,a metaphoris a figure of speech containing an implied comparison. With metaphors, words or phrases that are ordinarily applied to one thing are applied to something you wouldn’t necessarily pair it with. Metaphors are members of thefigurative languagefamily, which also include elements likesimiles,onomatopoeia, andpersonification.

Common Metaphor Examples

Some famous metaphors have become part of our everyday speech and are frequently used in writing…

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Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 15 June 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 15 June 2019!

For this week’s Lucky Dip, I have reached into my mystery bag and pulled out a Cascade. The topic is up to you!

You may be thinking to yourself, What on earth is a Cascade?

Luckily, Shadow Poetry has an explanation…

Cascade

Cascade, a form created by Udit Bhatia, is all about receptiveness, but in a smooth cascading way like a waterfall. The poem does not have any rhyme scheme; therefore, the layout is simple. Say the first verse has three lines. Line one of verse one becomes the last line of verse two. To follow in suit, the second line of verse one becomes the last line of verse three. The third line of verse one now becomes the last line of verse four, the last stanza of the poem. See the structure example below:

a/b/c, d/e/A…

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Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Sound Bite, 8 June 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Sound Bite, 8 June 2019!

This week we are hearing things, as we explore the use of ONOMATOPOEIA. You will need to use the THREE onomatopoeic words in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our three words, using onomatopoeia are:

  • howl
  • munch
  • plop

You may be asking yourself, How can I use onomatopoeia in my writing?

Luckily, Your Dictionaryhas some examples for you.

The word onomatopoeia comes from the combination of two Greek words,onomameaning “name” andpoieinmeaning “to make,” so onomatopoeia literally means “to make a name (or sound).” That is to say that the word means nothing more than the sound it makes. The word “boing,” for example, is simply a sound effect, but one that is very useful in making writing or storytelling more expressive and vivid.

Many onomatopoeic words can be verbs as well…

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Free Verse, Poetry by Sarah

Mercurial

The tread of time
is so ruthless,
that it tramples
even the kings
under its feet.

A mercurial thing
sparing no small mercy.
Those who feel
they have conquered it,
are indeed time’s folly.

Court jesters,
not royalty.

By Sarah ©2019

Sammi Scribbles, Weekend Writing Prompt, #108 – Mercurial , and also, Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie, Saturday Mix – Unique Personality, 1 June 2019

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Unique Personality, 1 June 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Unique Personality, 1 June 2019!

This week we are diving into the depths of PERSONIFICATION. Our challenge is all about the use of personification in our writing. You will need to use the statement provided in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our statement using, personification is:

The tread of time is so ruthless that it tramples even the kings under its feet.

You may be asking yourself, How can I use personification in my writing?

Luckily, Literary Devices has some examples for you.

Personification is one of the most commonly used and recognized literary devices. It refers to the practice of attaching human traits and characteristics with inanimate objects, phenomena and animals.

Common Personification Examples

Personification is part of our everyday speech and is frequently used in writing and oral language.

  • “The raging winds”
  • “The wise owl”
  • “The warm…

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Free Verse, Poetry by Sarah

Teach Your Children

Feed them, nourish them.
Put clothes on their back.
Show them they’re more important
Than alcohol or crack.
Teach your children.

Read them a story
when it’s bedtime.
Protect them from seeing
this world of crime.
Teach your children.

Clean the scrape on their knee.
Hug them when they’re sad.
Show them there’s tenderness,
Not just violence, to be had.
Teach your children.

Pay them attention,
not left to a device.
They’re only young once.
You don’t get to live twice.
Teach your children.

Tell them they matter.
Follow dreams and hope.
They can break the cycle,
of welfare and dope.
Teach your children.

Don’t foist your responsiblities
Upon those nearby.
Take ownership of your progeny
From caterpillar to butterfly.
Teach your children.

Protect their innoncence.
With precious lives in your hand.
They are your legacy,
Shape where they land.
Teach your children…but most importantly, love them too.

By Sarah ©2019

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie, Music Challenge – Teach Your Children