Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Double Take, 29 February 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix, 29 February 2020!

This week we are seeing double with ‘Double Take’.

The ‘Double Take’ challenge focuses on the use of homophones* to build your writing piece. You have two sets of homophones and you are challenged to use all of them in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our homophone sets this week are:

gait – manner of walking or running
gate – fence door

and

leased – rented
least – the minimum

You may be thinking to yourself, How can I use homophones in my writing?
Luckily, Kat at Literary Devices, has some examples for you.

Example of Homophones in Literature
This poem is filled homophones (marked in bold). They create a humorous effect in the poem through having the same pronunciation but altogether different meanings.

Sole owner am I of this sorry soul
pour

View original post 157 more words

Photos by Sarah, Tuesday Photo Challenge

Yard

Found this little fella in my yard yesterday

Gang-gang cockatoo

The gang-gang cockatoo is found in the cooler and wetter forests and woodlands of Australia, particularly alpine bushland. Mostly mild grey in colour with some lighter scalloping, the male has a red head and crest, while the female has a small fluffy grey crest.

Dutch Goes The Photo, Tuesday Photo Challenge, Week 201 – Yard

Other, Poetry by Sarah

Wildflowers

Wrought when wildflowers whispered,

”Who, what, when, where, why?”

Whence without wisdom we

went wayward;

Wading.

Wandering.

Withering.

Weeping.

Wholeness withheld;

Wasted, wretched, whilst

witnesses watched.

We wait.

We waste.

We whimper.

We wake.

 

By Sarah ©2020

 

 

 

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie, Music Challenge – “You Don’t Know How It Feels”; and also, Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie, Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 22 February 2020

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 22 February 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip,22 February2020!

For this week’s Lucky Dip, I have reached into my mystery bag and pulled out a Tautogram.The topic is up to you!

You may be thinking to yourself, What on earth is a Tautogram?

Luckily, Writer’s Digest has an explanation…

Tautogram Poems

The tautogram is best explained by its Greek root words of “tauto” meaning “the same” and “gramma” meaning “letter.” Basically, all words in the poem begin with the same letter.

So pick a letter–any letter–and get poeming!

Note: A variant form of this poem could employ a unique starting letter for each stanza.

Example of a Tautogram

Thoroughly Terse Tautogram

Twelve turkeys trekked through Turkey
to tell tales that tackled topsy-
turvy televangelists traipsing through
turnkey topics turned to tropics,
though ten teased topical tenets.

Copyright ©Robert Lee Brewer

Good luck with your ‘Lucky Dip Tautogram’ – I…

View original post 34 more words

Free Verse, Poetry by Sarah

Tarot

I laid out the cards
in a familiar spread
Holding my breath
To see what they said.

Worn at the edges
From overuse
Am I reading them properly?
What can I deduce?

If I’m being honest
About what I see.
The message I hope for
Is not meant to be.

Relationships that break,
Seldom mend
I must face facts.
We have to end.

This hope must die between
midnight and noon.
Get on with my life,
Leave the mess I’ve strewn.

I won’t sit back now,
I will not wait.
Trust in the Tarot but
Pave your own fate.

By Sarah ©️2020

Tarot

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie, Saturday Mix – Opposing Forces, 15 February 2020; and also, Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie, Sunday Writing Prompt “Tarot Reading”

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Opposing Forces, 15 February 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix, 15 February 2020!

This week we are dipping our toes into the pool of OPPOSITES. Our challenge is all about “opposing forces” and the use of antithesis in our writing. You will need to use the two opposing words in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our words this week are:

– mend and break

– noon and midnight

You may be asking yourself, How can I use antithetical statements in my writing?

Luckily, Kat from Literary Devices has some examples for you.

Common Antithesis Examples
Some famous antithetical statements have become part of our everyday speech and are frequently used in arguments and discussions. Below is the list of some antithetical statements:

You are easy on the eyes, but hard on the heart.
Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice.
Love is an ideal thing, marriage a real thing.

View original post 235 more words

Scribblings by Sarah

Fizz, Crack, Bang

There is a fizz as I flip the switch, and the luminescence of the fluorescent bulbs hurts my struggling eyes, and sleep sodden brain.

“It’s too early for this,” I think, longing for the comfort of my bed.

I drape myself into a nearby chair and wonder how this has all come about so soon. I offer up a desperate prayer, pleading for another few days – just to get myself sorted.

But the part-nervous-part-excitement lump in my stomach tells me, it’s time.

The intermittent chatter filters through the air, and the crack and bang of lockers signal they’re all here.

I clear my throat and a thousand eyes look my way.

I am in the zone.

I am a teacher…and the holidays are over.

By Sarah ©️2020

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie, Wordle #167

Free Verse

Muted

I feel tears welling up
Cold and deep inside
With pride that’s battered
I turn to run and hide

A stab of loneliness
Just can’t be shaken
It’s sharp and it’s painful
My heartache has awakened

In silent screams
My soul fruitlessly yells
But my lips are tightly sealed
And I’ll never ever tell

How much you hurt me
Never once suspecting
That I was not alone in
The hearts you were collecting

The race is on
But the winner loses all
A fleeting moment, your belle
Your affection my shawl

Waking up each morning
Smelling your deceit
Finding that you’re gone now
Is all so bittersweet

And now that it’s over
In my dreams you dwell
Haunting muted memories
That I long to quell

By Sarah ©️2020

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie, Music Challenge – The Race Is On; and also, Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie, Saturday Mix – Rhyme Time, 8 February 2020

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Rhyme Time, 8 February 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix, 8 February 2020!

This week we are “writing away, and having a play, with rhyming words for you today” with Rhyme Time.

‘Rhyme Time’ focuses on the use of rhyme to build your writing piece. You will be given six rhyming words* and need to use all of them (but not limited to these) in your response, which should be a poetry form of your choice.

*Homophones can be used as alternatives to the challenge words.

Our rhyming words this week are:

  1. bell (or belle)
  2. quell
  3. dwell
  4. smell
  5. yell
  6. tell

You may be thinking to yourself, How can I use rhyme in my writing?
Luckily, Kat at Literary Devices, has some examples for you.

Examples of Rhyme in Poetry
A rhyme is a repetition of similar sounding words, occurring at the end of lines in poems or songs. A rhyme is a tool…

View original post 339 more words

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Double Take, 1 February 2020

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix, 1 February 2020!

This week we are seeing double with ‘Double Take’.

The ‘Double Take’ challenge focuses on the use of homophones* to build your writing piece. You have two sets of homophones and you are challenged to use all of them in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our homophone sets this week are:

fair – even-handed

fare – payment

and

foul – grossly offensive to the senses

fowl – domestic hen or rooster

You may be thinking to yourself, How can I use homophones in my writing?
Luckily, Kat at Literary Devices, has some examples for you.

Example of Homophones in Literature
This poem is filled homophones (marked in bold). They create a humorous effect in the poem through having the same pronunciation but altogether different meanings.

Sole owner am I of this sorry soul

View original post 158 more words