Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Sound Bite, 31 August 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Sound Bite, 31 August 2019!

This week we are hearing things, as we explore the use of ONOMATOPOEIA. You will need to use the THREE onomatopoeic words in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our three words, using onomatopoeia are:

  • bark
  • chomp
  • giggle

You may be asking yourself, How can I use onomatopoeia in my writing?

Luckily, Your Dictionaryhas some examples for you.

The word onomatopoeia comes from the combination of two Greek words,onomameaning “name” andpoieinmeaning “to make,” so onomatopoeia literally means “to make a name (or sound).” That is to say that the word means nothing more than the sound it makes. The word “boing,” for example, is simply a sound effect, but one that is very useful in making writing or storytelling more expressive and vivid.

Many onomatopoeic words can be verbs as well…

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Other, Poetry by Sarah

Charisma

The flowers were blooming, and the bees
kissed them every now and then. Their
charisma – alluring; so
irresistible. Not
able to choose just
one they loved them
all. Pollen;
lustful
drug.

By Sarah ©2019

Image credit Pixabay

Ragtag Daily Prompt, Saturday 24 August: Charisma; and also, Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie, Saturday Mix – Unique Personality, 24 August 2019

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix, Uncategorized

Saturday Mix – Unique Personality, 24 August 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Unique Personality, 24 August 2019!

This week we are diving into the depths of PERSONIFICATION. Our challenge is all about the use of personification in our writing. You will need to use the statement provided in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our statement using, personification is:

The flowers were blooming, and the bees kissed them every now and then.

You may be asking yourself, How can I use personification in my writing?

Luckily, Literary Deviceshas some examples for you.

Personification is one of the most commonly used and recognized literary devices. It refers to the practice of attaching human traits and characteristics with inanimate objects, phenomena and animals.

Common Personification Examples

Personification is part of our everyday speech and is frequently used in writing and oral language.

  • “The raging winds”
  • “The wise owl”
  • “The warm and comforting fire”

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Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Mad About Metaphor, 17 August 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Mad About Metaphor, 17 August 2019!

This week we are dipping our toes into the pool of METAPHOR. Our challenge is all about the use of metaphor in our writing. You will need to use the metaphor provided in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our metaphor this week is:

Don’t shoot the messenger.

You may be asking yourself, How can I use metaphor in my writing?

Luckily, yourdictionary.comhas some examples for you.

Simply put,a metaphoris a figure of speech containing an implied comparison. With metaphors, words or phrases that are ordinarily applied to one thing are applied to something you wouldn’t necessarily pair it with. Metaphors are members of thefigurative languagefamily, which also include elements likesimiles,onomatopoeia, andpersonification.

Common Metaphor Examples

Some famous metaphors have become part of our everyday speech and are frequently used in writing…

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Free Verse, Poetry by Sarah

Song

Tub-thump.
Tub-thump.
Boom, boom, boom.

The beat pumps.
It vibrates through my head.

Tub-thump.
Tub-thump.
Boom, boom, boom.

Swirling lyrics wrap themselves around my tongue, clumsily falling from my mouth.

Tub-thump.
Tub-thump.
Boom, boom, boom.

The rhythm intensifies.
My frenzied mind scrambling to make sense of it.

Tub-thump.
Tub-thump.
Boom, boom, boom.

I feel out of control.
My body’s a slave to this tune.

Tub-thump.
Tub-thump.
Boom, boom, boom.

The room has become a pinprick. Just me, you, and the pulse.

Tub-thump.
Tub-thump.
Boom, boom, boom.

Then I realise.
I’ve heard this song before.
“It is love,” my heart continues to sing.

By Sarah ©️2019

Sammi Scribbles, Weekend Writing Prompt, #118 – Song

Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix, Tanka

Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 10 August 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Lucky Dip, 10 August 2019!

For this week’s Lucky Dip, I have reached into my mystery bag and pulled out a Tanka. The topic is up to you!

You may be thinking to yourself, What on earth is a Tanka?

Luckily, Shadow Poetry has an explanation…

Tanka
Tanka is a classic form of Japanese poetry related to the haiku with five unrhymed lines of five, seven, five, seven, and seven syllables. (5, 7, 5, 7, 7)

Example of Tanka

Example #1:
Peaceful solitude
intrinsic to our spirit
lost in pensive thought
standing on the edge of time
the road to nowhere special.

Copyright © 2002 Cheri L. Ahner

Example #2:
When things are tough and
change catches you unaware,
remember to stop.
Take time to see the beauty
in those monumental moments.

By Sarah ©2018

Good luck with your ‘Lucky Dip Tanka’ –…

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Challenges by Sarah, Mindlovemisery's Menagerie - Saturday Mix

Saturday Mix – Sound Bite, 3 August 2019

Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

Welcome to the Saturday Mix – Sound Bite, 3 August 2019!

This week we are hearing things, as we explore the use of ONOMATOPOEIA. You will need to use the THREE onomatopoeic words in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our three words, using onomatopoeia are:

  • whack
  • yelp
  • splish

You may be asking yourself, How can I use onomatopoeia in my writing?

Luckily, Your Dictionaryhas some examples for you.

The word onomatopoeia comes from the combination of two Greek words,onomameaning “name” andpoieinmeaning “to make,” so onomatopoeia literally means “to make a name (or sound).” That is to say that the word means nothing more than the sound it makes. The word “boing,” for example, is simply a sound effect, but one that is very useful in making writing or storytelling more expressive and vivid.

Many onomatopoeic words can be verbs as well…

View original post 256 more words